Get Your Torch For This Is Where Darkness Dwells, an Interview With Glen Krisch

Today I’d like to give you and interview with Glen Krisch, author of Where Darkness Dwells, and The Nightmare Within.  And Don’t say I’m not good to you folks, read on for some freebies

GNOH – Hi Glen, how are you doing?


I’m doing great, Ginger Nuts, thanks for having me.  As a thank you to your readers, I would like to extend an offer of a free copy of either one of my novels, The Nightmare Within, or Where Darkness Dwells.  Details can be found at the end of this interview.


GNOH – Could you give the readers some background information on yourself?


I live and breathe writing, and that’s no cliché.  I’ve always spent a lot of my time in my head, and when I’m there, I’m dreaming up new plots, characters and conflicts.  I would still write even I never had another story published.  It’s who I am.
I’m  also an editor. I’ve been a freelancer for a few years and have copy edited books for Creeping Hemlock Press (works by Tim Lebbon and Lawrence Block).  I’ve also worked with authors/podcasters Douglas Lain and KMO.  I recently accepted an editing position with Morrigan Books, which I’m really excited about.
Besides writing and editing, I’m a father of two boys (with a third on the way), a husband of one, a sometime runner, and a firm believer in sustainable environmentalism.  My goal would be to run a small organic farm and write full-time.  Some day, Ginger Nuts, some day.


GNOH – So why horror?


That’s a tough question to answer.  It’s like trying to describe why you like a particular color.  You just know it speaks to you.  Most of my stories have no intended genre during the conception stage, but by the time I type “the end” there’s usually a fairly strong dark element involved.   


GNOH – What type of horror do you prefer to write?


Most of my horror has been of the supernatural variety.  Instead of gore propelling the plot, I like to use thriller elements to advance the story.  For me, it’s all about conflict and putting your characters through the wringer.

GNOH –The Nightmare Within is your debut novel, can you tell us what it’s about?



I find describing my novels more difficult than the actual writing of them, so here’s the Amazon description:
“Maury has the power to pull dreams into the waking world, giving the dreams corporeal form. These dream-people range from seemingly human figures, to monstrous beasts compelled by the most primal urges. Once exposed to the real world, the dreams evolve, adapting to their surroundings.

Maury is gathering dreams for display at Lucidity, the soon-to-open Museum of Dreams. From a boy named Kevin, he removes Mr. Freakshow, a nightmare feeding on the trauma of Kevin having recently witnessed his father’s murder.

As Maury falls in love with a dream-woman named Joy, he realizes how wrong it is to enclose the dreams. During the Lucidity’s Grand Opening, Mr. Freakshow escapes. To create a diversion, Mr. Freakshow frees the other dreams. The Nightmares, The Erotic Dreams, The Serenity Dreams–all of the dreams–invade the city.

Mr. Freakshow knows the rules that govern the dreams:
1. A dream-person achieves immortality by killing its dreamer.
2. If a dreamer dies for any other reason, the embodied dream disappears forever.

At first Maury seeks out Mr. Freakshow in order to stop him, only to realize there is only one way to accomplish this; he must find Kevin first, killing him before the nightmare has its way.

Kevin will do whatever it takes to be free of his nightmare, once and for all.
Maury will do whatever it takes to protect the love of his life.
Mr. Freakshow will do whatever it takes to realize his immortality.

Will Kevin survive his nightmare?”

GNOH – What inspired you to write it?


I wanted to write a story about a kid in peril.  That kind of story works really well with horror.  I decided to have the boy, Kevin, witness his father’s murder and then suffer from horrible nightmares.  Once I came up with that part, I decided to twist the idea, to have his nightmare come to life, to have the nightmare man, Mr. Freakshow, terrorize him during his waking hours as well.
So, I had the above inspiration for a number of months, and had even completed a few chapters.  At the time, I talked a lot about wanting to write.  I just wanted to write and tell stories, and boy did I ever talk about it.  One day my wife snapped at me and told me to stop talking about it and do it.  She said, “Either be a writer or not.  Don’t be someone who only talks about it.”
That was an eye-opener, I tell ya’.
With my plot in mind, and my wife’s boot firmly planted in my rear, I found the inspiration to finish 
the novel.  I haven’t stopped since.


GNOH – So what has been your worst nightmare?


On a couple of occasions, I’ve suffered from sleep paralysis.  It’s a condition when you are stuck between waking and dreaming.  Your eyes are open, but you can’t move.  Your body protects itself during sleep by basically paralyzing itself.  It’s the reason you don’t act out what you are experiencing in your sleep.  When you suffer from sleep paralysis, it’s the worst possible feeling.  You can’t move, you can’t wake up, but your eyes are open and you’re feeling the fear of a nightmare.  Scary stuff.


GNOH – What made you decide to go the self publishing route?


A small press originally agreed to publish The Nightmare Within, but then the bottom fell out of the economy.  The publisher decided to pull out of publishing it, not wanting to commit to the financial risk of publishing a new author during unpredictable times.  The whole process from my original submission until he cut ties with the book took almost three years.  I wasn’t up for another potential multi-year wait, and after seeing how other writers had successfully self-published, I decided to give it a try.  I knew I had a good book, and that it was as polished as you would find with a New York publisher.  I figured if I presented my work to the public in a professional manner, it would find an audience.


GNOH – How well has it been received?


The one thing I’m missing is the reputation that comes with being a traditionally published author.  Before I decided to self-publish, I’d had short stories published for close to a decade.  Even so, I’m still basically a nobody.  There’s no critical mass of people clamoring for my work based on my previous efforts.  That’s why I’m pursuing both a traditional publisher as well as planning on releasing additional indie releases.  I have more than enough ideas to follow both paths.  For me, it’s not an either/or proposition.     
The people who have read The Nightmare Within have loved it.  They find my work original.  They find my characters believable.  I’ve had fan letters complaining about the hell I put Kevin (and his grandmother) through.  That tells me I’m doing something right.  My Amazon and Goodreads reviews have been particularly strong.  My sales haven’t taken off yet, but for those people who have taken a chance on reading my work, they’re usually happy with the gamble.  It’s especially rewarding when complete strangers decide to read both of my books.  That tells me that I’m on the right path.  I can’t tell you how surreal that feels. 

GNOH – Where Darkness Dwells is your latest novel, did you find this easier to write, based on the experiences of writing The Nightmare Within?



I once read that writing is the only skill that doesn’t get easier the more you practice.  I couldn’t agree more.  I’ve become a better writer over the years, but that doesn’t mean the effort has gotten any easier.
Where Darkness Dwells is a larger book, both in length (105k vs. 85k words), and scope.  With The Nightmare Within, I focused mostly on a single family.  Where Darkness Dwells has a cast that includes an entire town.  It also takes place during the Great Depression, so I needed to do a lot of research to get the details as accurate as possible.


GNOH – Do you have any rituals when you write?


Just, sit down and write.  It’s simple, but I guess it would still qualify.


GNOH – How has your New Year resolution held up so far?


I used to set resolutions and they would always be unrealistic, and I would ultimately fail.  This year, I resolved to put in as much writing time as I could manage per day.  After working my outside job, I have four days off a week.  If I can make steady progress during my days off, the pages really start to add up.


GNOH – So what do you think makes a good book?


For fiction, I love believable characters, both good and evil.  I like conflict that builds throughout the book.


GNOH – So what does the future hold for you?


In the last couple of months I’ve:
1. finished a coming-of-age horror novel set in 1984 called Nothing Lasting
2. finished a novella called “Brother’s Keeper” that was requested by a prestigious small press.
3. started edits on my debut story collection, Through the Eyes of Strays, that will be out this summer through the U.K. small press, Dog Horn Publishing.
I can’t predict what my future holds, but I know I have a lot of stories to write.  As long as I get the stories down, figuring out if they’re right for traditional or indie publishing will come later.
Book Giveaway Instructions:


For anyone who would like to take a chance on this indie guy and receive a free ebook, just follow these few steps:
1. Link this interview on one of your social networking sites or personal blog.
2. Copy the link in the comments below
3. Email me at glenkrisch@gmail.com, and I’ll send you a free copy of either one of my novels.  Just state if you would like to read The Nightmare Within or Where Darkness Dwells.
Selling links:
The Nightmare Within
Where Darkness Dwells
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